Why you should not buy an Ebola Haz Mat suit

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Across the county, people are in panic over a US Ebola outbreak.  Many have raced into purchases of hazmat suites or other NBC (Nuclear Biological Chemical) gear.  Personally, I think this is a complete waste of money.  Let me tell you why…

First, let’s take some examples of fully trained individuals with full PPE (Personal Protective Equipment) that got infected by Ebola:

  • Dr. Kent Bradley was the doctor who was treating Ebola patients in Africa.  Him and another missionary worker were working around Ebola patients day and night.  They knew the virus and the precautions that were necessary to prevent exposure.  They were trained, had appropriate PPE, but still got infected.
  • A Dallas health care worker who tended to America’s “Patient Zero”, was trained and had full PPE, but still got infected.  The CDC says there was a breach of protocol, however with all the other CDC Lies, I don’t know whether I trust them on this statement.

As with any preparedness skill, the top two incidents should tell you that it’s not just about having PPE against Ebola.  You have to train yourself how to use it, and even if you do, there is no assurance that it will work.

Do you know how to de-gown properly?

I’ve worked in sterile pharmaceutical manufacture for over 4 years as a microbiologist.  Did you know it’s not as simple as just putting on or taking off some suit?  There is a stringent 15 minute process to aseptically gown.  While aspetic gowning isn’t critical for protecting yourself from the virus (it’s more practical for protecting the pharmaceutical product from human bacteria), you should use this as a reference to show you that there must be as stringent of a process to de-gown.  If you are touching your bare hands against the exterior of your PPE while you’re taking it off, it would completely negate the purpose.

If you get your PPE off successfully without contaminating yourself, then what?

If it’s a one time use – burn it.  If you’re going to re-use it, you have to have a disinfection protocol.  Take a look at the PPE used in Africa.  They have their gloves and boots all lined up for disinfection via bleach solution.  They have to have the right concentration and right contact time before they are able to handle it.  Have you thought about this?

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So if the answer is not having a pandemic suit, what is the answer?

Viruses are the invisible and silent killer.  You never know where they are until it’s too late.  In the current situation, your best protection is basic hygiene.  Wash your hands, don’t touch your face, take your shoes off before walking around your house, etc.

If it ever gets to a point where there is an epidemic of ebola in your community, your best defense is self-quarantine at home.  If you were a good prepper, you would have already stocked food, water and other essentials so you would not have to venture off into a potentially contaminated super market.

There are some other practical tips I have, and they can be found by reading my Ebola Protection Plan.

  • defineaproblem

    This is more like what I remember
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e_LhjgXjPeo

    The units are puffy because scuba give you higher pressure so air only flows out of suit.
    Scuba tanks only last so long and the units can get very hot.
    Several people I know used old flack jacket with frozen jell packs replacing the metal pieces. Really help extend time before over heating in hot weather.